Press Release: CDM High Level Panel’s recommendations do not deliver

Brussels, 10 Sept, 2012. Today the High-Level Panel for the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) Policy Dialogue presented its final report with recommendations on how to improve the CDM. The report fails to address some of the fundamental flaws of the CDM, in particular how to address the large oversupply of credits that do not represent …

Watch This! NGO Voices on the CDM #2

The heat is on as last projects from emerging economies rush to registration before the change of eligibility for the European market at the end of the year will take effect. Dirty coal will not make the race as the methodology remains suspended. This decision kicks almost all future carbon credits from coal power projects out of the EU ETS. Good timing! While this is amazing news, much work still needs to be done to create finance mechanisms with net benefits for climate and people. Maybe the development of sustainable development goals launched this year at Rio+20 will be able to break the deadlock and contribute to

First-of-its-Kind and Common Practice

Scroll down for French and Spanish First-of-its-kind and common practice tests are part of the additionality test each prospective CDM projects has to go through. First-of-its-Kind The first-of-its-kind rule under the CDM states that a project is automatically deemed additional if: (a) The project is the first in the applicable geographical area that applies a …

Industrial Gases (HFC-23 & N2O)

Scroll down for French and Spanish HFC-23 HFC-23 is an unwanted by-product in the manufacture of HCFC-22, a refrigerant and temporary substitute for CFCs. The destruction of HFC-23 in HCFC-22 plants in developing countries can be registered as a CDM project and leads to the issuance of a large amount of credits (CERs). As it …

CDM Watch Summary of the European Commission Study on the Integrity of the Clean Development Mechanism

In December 2011, the European Commission published the “Study on the integrity of the Clean Development Mechanism”[1]. Under European Commission contract, this study was carried out by AEA, the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) and CO2logic. The study consists of one final report presenting the findings of seven accompanying briefing papers. The objectives of this study were to develop an in-depth understanding on the current CDM system (its merits and shortcomings) and options for reform as well as potential alternative mechanisms and their impacts.

CDM Watch Summary of the European Commission Study on the Integrity of the Clean Development Mechanism

In December 2011, the European Commission published the “Study on the integrity of the Clean Development Mechanism”[1]. Under European Commission contract, this study was carried out by AEA, the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) and CO2logic. The study consists of one final report presenting the findings of seven accompanying briefing papers. The objectives of this study were to develop an in-depth understanding on the current CDM system (its merits and shortcomings) and options for reform as well as potential alternative mechanisms and their impacts.

Policy Brief: A New Look at Loopholes

To date, 42 developed countries (Annex 1) have submitted pledges. Fulfilment of the developed country pledges is projected to reduce emissions by up to 4 billion tons (Gt) CO2e in 2020 from “business as usual” (UNEP 2010). This is about one third of the estimated 12 GtCO2e of emissions reductions that would be needed to remain on a path consistent with keeping warming below 2°C (UNEP 2011). Unfortunately, weaknesses in international emissions accounting could substantially weaken these already insufficient pledges, negating much if not all of their intended emissions benefits. In this paper, we address the following five “loopholes” in the existing negotiation framework.

Policy Brief: A New Look at Loopholes

To date, 42 developed countries (Annex 1) have submitted pledges. Fulfilment of the developed country pledges is projected to reduce emissions by up to 4 billion tons (Gt) CO2e in 2020 from “business as usual” (UNEP 2010). This is about one third of the estimated 12 GtCO2e of emissions reductions that would be needed to remain on a path consistent with keeping warming below 2°C (UNEP 2011). Unfortunately, weaknesses in international emissions accounting could substantially weaken these already insufficient pledges, negating much if not all of their intended emissions benefits. In this paper, we address the following five “loopholes” in the existing negotiation framework.

The CDM Executive Board 2011 – What to expect (Newsletter #12)

CDM Watch welcomes yesterday´s appointment of Martin Hession, an Irish national who works for the UK’s Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) to chair the Board. Maosheng Duan from China was elected Vice-Chairman. In addition, a number of new members were elected to the Executive Board at COP 16 in Cancún bringing the following …