EU carbon market reforms must go further and arrive sooner

For the last couple of years, the European carbon market has failed to provide a signal for decarbonisation with carbon prices hovering around 5 euros for a tonne of CO2. To address this, earlier this year, the European Commission proposed to reform the EU’s Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in order to provide a more …

4 billion tonnes of hot air in the EU could turn the proposed 40% climate target into merely 26%

On 23 and 24 October 2014, EU’s Heads of State will determine Europe’s future action to avoid dangerous global temperature rise. At this important date, it is expected that they will propose to reduce Europe’s domestic greenhouse gas emissions by 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. Of course, this proposed target is not nearly enough …

Carbon Market Watch reaction to leaked 2030 Council Conclusions

On 23 and 24 October 2014, EU’s heads of state will determine Europe’s future action to avoid dangerous global temperature rises. At this important date, they will decide whether to follow the European Commission’s proposal to reduce 40% domestic greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions below 1990 levels by 2030. The proposed target of 40% GHG …

Draft EU Council conclusions propose taxpayers continue subsidising industry’s pollution to avoid a problem that doesn’t exist.

In early September, the council conclusions on the 2030 climate and energy framework were leaked. Worryingly, the draft text stated that the current practice of giving free pollution permits to heavy emitters needs to be maintained while “dynamically” allocating these permits based on actual production levels. A rebuttal by Carbon Market Watch shows that this approach could result in EU taxpayers paying industry an extra €130 billion worth of free emission allowances, while the public have never been presented proof that carbon leakage actually exists.

The EU Emissions Trading System: All You Need To Know About The World’s Largest Carbon Market

Tuesday 22 July 2014 from 15:00 to 17:00 European Parliament – Room JAN 6Q1 AN EVENT KINDLY HOSTED BY: Peter LIESE, EPP Matthias GROOTE, S&D Gerben-Jan GERBRANDY, ALDE Bas EICKHOUT, Greens/EFA The EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) is the largest carbon market in the world covering more than 11,000 power stations and industrial plants …

Policy Briefing: What’s needed to fix the EU’s carbon market: Recommendations for the Market Stability Reserve and future ETS reform proposals

Executive Summary The EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) is the largest carbon market in the world and was originally seen as the cornerstone of Europe’s climate policies. However, the EU ETS has suffered from a large amount of excess emissions allowances largely caused by weak emission reduction targets and the inflow of carbon offsets. …

New analysis of Effort Sharing Decision calls for ambitious post-2020 target

Carbon Market Watch has presented new ideas on how to tackle the sixty percent of EU greenhouse gas emissions covered under the so-called Effort Sharing Decision (ESD). Two new reports published in June look at how successful the legislation, which only entered the implementation phase last year, has been in tackling emissions from sectors such as agriculture, transport and buildings which are not covered by the EU’s carbon market.

Report: Tackling 60% of the EU’s Climate Problem – The Legislative Framework of the Effort Sharing Decision

Sectors not included under the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), the so called non-ETS sectors are covered under the Effort Sharing Decision (ESD) which defines the 2020 greenhouse gas reduction targets for these sectors for each Member State. Although these non-ETS sectors include nearly 60% of the EU’s emissions, there has been little focus on the non-ETS sectors and the functioning of the ESD. The EU ETS started already in 2005. The ESD, on the other hand, is part of the 2020 climate and energy package which started only in 2013. The relatively short experience with the ESD may be one of the reasons for the limited awareness about the ESD. Few countries and even NGOs have thought about either the risks of potential loopholes or the opportunities the ESD offers to go beyond the current mitigation commitments.