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Briefings
22 Dec 2015

Paris outcomes: Carbon Market Watch Analysis of COP 21

From 30 November to 12 December 2015, Parties to the UNFCCC met in Paris to negotiate a new global climate treaty.

The Paris Agreement was a remarkable outcome, especially after the failures of Copenhagen. Almost all involved, including Carbon Market Watch, seemed surprised at how positive the outcome was. However, expectations had been carefully managed in the preceding years, so that aspirations of environmentalists to have a treaty that reflected the scientific reality by dividing up the remaining global carbon budget, had been downplayed into unreality.

Briefings
21 Dec 2015

Analysis: The impact of the Paris agreement on the EU’s climate policies

Last December in Paris, a global climate deal was adopted in which all countries have agreed to take action on climate change. Ahead of the climate summit, almost 190 countries representing over 90% of global greenhouse gas emissions registered their climate commitments. Europe, which long thought of itself as the lone wolf in tackling climate change, is therefore no longer going it alone.

Briefings
30 Nov 2015

Report: Using nature to pardon environmental pollution – Risks of agriculture sequestration carbon offsets

Agriculture supports the livelihoods of around a half of the world’s population, but is at the same time a notable source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) driving climate change. As of one the options to tackle emissions in the sector, governments have been discussing to include additional agricultural activities into the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the United Nations Climate Change Convention (UNFCCC) since 2011. Whether agricultural activities should be eligible for carbon offsetting programmes is not only topical within discussions in the UNFCCC but also within certain regional cap-and-trade schemes and discussions to establish a market based mechanism for international aviation emissions, expected to be adopted in October 2016 under the auspices of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Briefings
30 Nov 2015

Policy Brief: Fossil and biological carbon: a tonne is not a tonne

Whether biological carbon credit should be traded in carbon markets is topical, with discussions ongoing in the UNFCCC, ICAO and the California Cap-and-Trade system. To date, compliance markets have rejected the eligibility of biological carbon offsets. They are right to do so. Fossil and biological carbon operate on different parts of the carbon cycle, and on very different timescales. Fossil carbon is permanent; biological carbon is potentially and frequently subject to rapid fluxes, whether natural or manmade. For these reasons, offset credits from REDD+, afforestation and reforestation or other biological systems should not be treated as fungible with fossil carbon, but should instead be addressed through other, appropriate, policy measures.

Briefings
5 Oct 2015

Carbon leakage myth buster

The current EU ETS rules have granted preferential treatment to industrial companies deemed at risk of “carbon leakage” in the form of awarding free pollution permits. The ongoing legislative process to revise the EU ETS rules for the post-2020 period provides an important opportunity to revisit the rules under which industrial sectors may be deemed at risk of carbon leakage.

Briefings
17 Sep 2015

Policy Brief: Four magic potions to turn the EU ETS into an effective climate mitigation tool

In July 2015, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal to revise the EU’s Emissions Trading System (ETS) in order to implement the EU’s 2030 target of at least 40% domestic emission reductions. Although the proposal suggests a few improvements, it fails to introduce much needed provisions that improve the mitigation potential of the EU ETS.

Briefings
5 May 2015

Towards a global carbon market – Risks of linking the EU ETS to other carbon markets

The number of regions and countries that are putting a price on carbon pollution is vastly increasing. Nearly 40 countries already price carbon or plan to do so, including China that will roll out a national carbon market from 2016 onwards. Linking these different carbon markets is being envisaged by several European policymakers.

Briefings
5 May 2015

REPORT: Towards a global carbon market – Prospect for linking the EU ETS to other carbon markets

Jurisdictions with carbon markets currently account for about 40% of global economic activity (GDP)[1]. Linking these different carbon markets with the ultimate goal of establishing a global carbon market is seen as an integral part of the future climate regime, since it can increase the pool of mitigation options available, thereby reducing costs and allowing countries to increase their climate ambition. These benefits however only materialize if the linked carbon markets have a similar level of ambition and a similar design of a number of key features, such as price controls, quantitative and qualitative restrictions on carbon offsets, and the type of allocation method used. Paradoxically, while lower abatement costs are an important economic motive for linking two emission trading systems, they can also constitute a significant political barrier, since citizens of the higher cost system might be reluctant to pay for emission reductions in the other jurisdiction.

Briefings
25 Nov 2014

Views on the discussions on additional land use, land-use change and forestry activities (LULUCF) and specific alternative approaches to addressing the risk of non-permanence

Carbon Market Watch welcomes the opportunity to provide input on discussions on specific possible additional land use, land-use change and forestry activities and specific alternative approaches to addressing the risk of non-permanence under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).

Briefings
30 Oct 2014

Analysis of Europe’s 2030 Climate Ambition

During the night of 23 October 2014, EU leaders brokered a deal on the 2030 climate and energy headline targets. EU’s Heads of States settled on an EU-binding renewable energy target of at least 27%, an indicative energy efficiency target of at least 27% and an at least 40% binding domestic greenhouse gas reduction target…