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Briefings
1 Sep 2015

Policy Brief: Social and environmental accountability of climate finance instruments

Climate change is a global injustice to present and future generations, and one of the greatest human rights challenges of our time. For one, climate change has a significant effect on several human rights, such as the right to safe and adequate water and food, the right to health and adequate housing, and the right to life. On the other hand, certain actions to address climate change can directly result in adverse impacts on human rights.

Briefings
17 Mar 2015

Fact Sheet – Santa Rita, CDM Hydro Dam in Guatemala

ENGLISH The Santa Rita Hydroelectric Plant in the Dolores River in the Alta Verapaz region in Guatemala was registered as a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project in June 2014. The communities living in the Alta Verapaz region are completely dependent on the water of the river for their livelihoods. The Guatemalan Agreement on Identity and Rights of Indigenous Peoples…

Briefings
20 Feb 2015

The Geneva Pledge for Human Rights in Climate Action

We, the undersigned, note that climate change-related impacts have a range of implications, both direct and indirect, for the effective enjoyment of human rights, and recognize that while these implications affect individuals and communities around the world, the effects of climate change will be felt most acutely by those segments of the population who are already in vulnerable situations owing to factors such as geography, poverty, gender, age, indigenous or minority status and disability.

Briefings
9 Feb 2015

Local realities of CDM projects A compilation of case studies

Content Sasan coal power project, India Adani’s Mundra coal power project, India The Barro Blanco Hydroelectric Power Plant Project, Panama The Chengdu Luodai MSW Incinerator, China The small scale Kukke Hydro Project, India Small hydroelectric dam Aurora I, Honduras The Palo Viejo Hydroelectric Project, Guatemala

Briefings
25 Nov 2014

Views on the discussions on additional land use, land-use change and forestry activities (LULUCF) and specific alternative approaches to addressing the risk of non-permanence

Carbon Market Watch welcomes the opportunity to provide input on discussions on specific possible additional land use, land-use change and forestry activities and specific alternative approaches to addressing the risk of non-permanence under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).

Briefings
30 Oct 2014

Analysis of Europe’s 2030 Climate Ambition

During the night of 23 October 2014, EU leaders brokered a deal on the 2030 climate and energy headline targets. EU’s Heads of States settled on an EU-binding renewable energy target of at least 27%, an indicative energy efficiency target of at least 27% and an at least 40% binding domestic greenhouse gas reduction target…

Briefings
16 Dec 2013

COP 19 Side Event Summary Report

Human Rights: How lessons learnt from the CDM can inform the design of New Market Mechanisms On 15 November 2013, as part of the COP19 in Warsaw, Carbon Market Watch organised a side event jointly with Gujarat Forum on CDM, Centro de Incidencia Ambiental (CIAM), Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental (CEMDA), the Center for International…

Briefings
22 Jan 2013

Briefing Note for ICAO: Carbon Offsetting – Do’s and Don’ts

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) is currently developing a global market-based measure to address greenhouse gas emissions from international aviation. An agreement is expected in September 2013 at ICAO’s triennial Assembly. A group of experts was established in 2012 to provide technical advice to ICAO’s Council. The group’s technical suggestions now include a mandatory…

Briefings
21 Dec 2012

Carbon Market Watch Analysis COP-18: We won a game of poker on the Titanic!

Much to our regret, countries who met at COP18 in Doha did little to address the billion tonne gap we need to close in order to keep us safe from catastrophic climate effects: No new mitigation pledges were made and most loopholes remain. Yet, some positive decisions were taken: Parties did agree that no new hot air should be created in the next Kyoto commitment period and that only a limited amount of the 13 billion tonnes of Hot Air from the first commitment period can be used.