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Briefings
5 Jun 2017

A Clean Fit: The role of the EU ETS in the energy policy landscape

Executive Summary Around the world, governments are establishing carbon pricing systems to put a price-tag on greenhouse gas emissions and incentivize more climate friendly practices. The EU launched its own Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005. While the ETS is a necessary instrument to decarbonise the power and industry sectors in Europe, experience shows…

Letters
29 May 2017

Open letter to EU environment ministers on ETS funds

Dear Environment Minister, Ahead of the upcoming trilogue meeting on the revision of EU’s Emission Trading System (ETS), the undersigned, representing 30 networks and organizations representing citizens from across Europe, would like to urge you to ensure that the funding mechanisms dedicated to help lower-income Member States transform their energy systems (article 10c and the…

Letters
28 Feb 2017

Open letter to EU Environment Ministers on the revision of the EU ETS

Dear Environment Minister, Ahead of the Environment Council we, the undersigned, representing 31 networks and organizations from 30 countries, would like to urge you to ensure that the low-carbon funding mechanisms dedicated to help lower-income Member States transform their energy systems (article 10c and the Modernization Fund) are robust and well-designed to truly support the…

Letters
16 Feb 2017

Joint NGO letter to IATA: Airlines shouldn’t use Montreal resolution to undermine domestic European climate ambition

The undersigned organisations represent civil society working to limit aviation’s large and rapidly growing climate impact. We believe that the airline industry’s efforts to address its emissions fall well short of what is needed. Further, years of fuel and other tax exemptions and opt-outs from effective climate policies continue to undermine efforts to limit global warming.

Briefings
6 Feb 2017

How the EU ETS can incentivize cement’s low-carbon transition

Questions and answers on the introduction of an import inclusion scheme for cement On 14 February 2017, the plenary of the European Parliament will vote on the revision of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. Members will vote on the report of the environment committee (ENVI) which was adopted in December…

Policy Submissions
6 Feb 2017

How the EU ETS can incentivize cement’s low-carbon transition

On 14 February 2017, the plenary of the European Parliament will vote on the revision of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. Members will vote on the report of the environment committee (ENVI) which was adopted in December 2016. A key element of the compromise reached between all major political groups in ENVI is the introduction of a mechanism that requires importers of cement and clinker to also pay for their pollution, while ensuring that carbon costs are reflected in material prices.

Briefings
29 Nov 2016

EU Emissions Trading System Quiz

Test your knowledge on the EU Emission Trading System (EU ETS) by playing our short quiz! EU Emissions Trading System Quiz Test your knowledge on the EU Emission Trading System (EU ETS) by playing our short quiz! Answers available in Carbon Market Watch’s new report on “Industry windfall profits from Europe’s carbon market 2008-2015′ and…

Briefings
29 Nov 2016

Cement’s pollution windfall from the EU ETS

The cement sector is responsible for 5% of global greenhouse gas emissions. In Europe, the sector emits more greenhouse gases than the whole Belgian economyi. In light of the Paris Agreement objectives, the cement industry will need to achieve deep emission reductions in the coming years. The EU’s main instrument to decarbonise cement – the EU ETS – has however failed to deliver this so far: By subsidizing pollution, there has hardly been a sufficient economic incentive to leverage emission cuts in the cement sector.

Briefings
29 Nov 2016

Mythbuster Reload – Industry windfall profits from Europe’s carbon market 2008-2015 

This report interprets the findings of an updated CE Delft study that shows how energy-intensive companies in 20 European countries have massively profited from their pollution because they are deemed at risk of “carbon leakage”. “Carbon leakage” refers to the hypothetical situation where companies transfer production to countries with weaker climate policies in order to lower their costs. Under the current EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) rules, industrial companies that are believed to be at risk of “carbon leakage” are awarded free emission allowances.

Letters
21 Nov 2016

Open letter to Members of the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety of the European Parliament on the revision of the EU ETS

November 2016 Dear Members of the European Parliament’s Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, We, the undersigned, 31 organisations and networks working on a coal free Europe call on you to vote for a meaningful revision of the EU’s Emission Trading System (EU ETS) that supports the rapid decarbonisation of Europe’s energy systems…