Editorial for Newsletter Issue #2, March 2013

Dear Friends, Carbon Market Watch is happy to introduce you to the new online version of our newsletter. In this issue, we look at a real hot issue in Doha at COP-18 regarding how countries would deal with the 13 billion left over emission permits from the first Kyoto commitment period. Although we did not …

Carbon Market Watch Newsletter Issue #2, March 2013

In this issue, we look at a real hot issue in Doha at COP-18 regarding how countries would deal with the 13 billion left over emission permits from the first Kyoto commitment period. Although we did not get full cancellation of the surplus, the Doha outcome was a success. Parties decided that only a part of the huge amount of ‘hot air’ can be used until 2020. A clever amendment made to the Kyoto Protocol will also avoid the build-up of new surplus….

The Folly of New Market Mechanisms (Newsletter #2)

Despite severely over-supplied carbon markets and missing mitigation commitments by countries around the world to set the world on a low-emission pathway, countries are developing a work programme to implement New Market Mechanisms and a so called Framework for Various Approaches. Needless to say, focusing on the creation of additional carbon credit supply without the …

Joint Implementation: CDM’s little brother grew up to be big and nasty (Newsletter #2)

Joint Implementation (JI) offsets account for one third of all Kyoto carbon offsets that have been issued to date. Despite the fact that JI has been marred by a lack of transparency and a glut of credits with very questionable environmental integrity, they continue to be used for compliance in Europe and elsewhere. It remains …

Carbon Market Watch @ Work (Newsletter #2)

Publications Press Releases Press Statement: Aviation ETS vote in ENVI Committee (26.02.2013) Press Statement: Carbon Market Watch view on ‘backloading’ proposal (19.02.2013) Policy Briefs and Studies  Policy Brief: Doha decisions on the Kyoto surplus explained (04.03.2013) ICAO briefing note: Carbon Offsetting – Do’s and Don’ts (21.02.2013) Submissions and Public Inputs EC Consultation on structural options …

Short Fix to the Ailing ETS: What next for the world’s largest carbon market? (Newsletter #2)

Although the back-loading plan was meant to be a small intervention to prop up carbon prices, the last seven months of heated debates make this a ‘make or break’ deal. This past week, the Environment Committee in the European Parliament voted in favour of the European Commission’s ‘back-loading’ plan to amend the EU Emissions Trading …

What finance for REDD+? (Newsletter #2)

Forests play a vital role in mitigating climate change and are crucial in the struggle for sustainable development. Not only do they have a fundamental role in the preservation of global ecological systems, they are especially important for supporting the lives and livelihoods of an estimated 1.6 billion forest dependent peoples. The ability of forest …

“Stopping-the-clock” on emissions from air travel – what’s the buzz? (Newsletter #2)

This year is a crucial one for countries to finally address emissions from international aviation, which is responsible for 4.9% of man-made global warming. The Kyoto Protocol requires Parties to find solutions to mitigate emissions from aviation by working through the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Since Kyoto however, ICAO has proved to be incapable …

Resuscitating the Clean Development Mechanism (Newsletter #2)

During the 7th Conference of the Parties (COP-7) held in Marrakesh in 2001, Parties to the Kyoto Protocol decided to review the modalities and procedures of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and  agree upon a revised set of rules at COP-19. Although the political decisions taken at COP-18 in Doha ignored the severe quality concerns …

Doha on AAUs: The Future of the Phantom Menace (Newsletter #2)

A real hot issue in Doha at COP18 was how countries would deal with the 13 billion left over emission permits from the first Kyoto commitment period. After tense negotiations, countries decided to restrict how much of this surplus can be used for compliance with emission reduction targets. With the aim to avoid the build-up …